RSS

Monthly Archives: July 2009

Use your cell phone to diagnose diseases.


Microscopy provides a simple, cost-effective, and vital method for the diagnosis and screening of hematologic and infectious diseases.It is an essential tool in disease diagnosis and widely used all over the world. Unfortunately, the EXPERTISE required to use the tool, and to evaluate the findings is not very common. One requires a pathologist with many years of experience to make sense of those seemingly random and confused pixels. ( I know, i am a pathologist :-)

But the advent of digital imaging has solved many of our troubles. Telepathology made sure that we do not need a pathologist physically present at the site, to render a diagnosis. But microscopy and digital imaging of the biopsy/tissue fragment was still a hassle. Now we have done better. You don’t even need a microscope to send a microscopic image over the network!!Researchers from the Univ. of California worked with high-powered LED – which retails for just a few dollars – coupled with a typical camera phone to produce a clinical quality image sufficient for detecting in a field setting some of the most common diseases in the developing world.

The newly developed technology, CellScope, allows for average cell cameras to be retrofitted with powerful microscopes, able to detect malaria parasites, and even fluorescent marker-stained tuberculosis bacteria.Thus you have your humble cell-phone transformed into the “cell-scope”.

(a) Thick smear of Giemsa-stained malaria-infected blood. (b) Thin smear of Giemsa-stained malaria-infected blood. (c) Sickle-cell anaemia blood smear. White arrows point to two sickled red blood cells. Scale bars are 10 µm.

“The images can either be analyzed on site or wirelessly transmitted to clinical centers for remote diagnosis. The system could be used to help provide early warning of outbreaks by shortening the time needed to screen, diagnose and treat infectious diseases,” University of California in San Francisco (UCSF)/UCB Bioengineering Graduate Group graduate student David Breslauer adds

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 31, 2009 in e-health

 

Tags: ,

HIPAA compliant mobile consultations for Doctors



Finally, a commercially available intelligent system to allow all physicians to provide consultations from anywhere, simply through a Blackberry ( or any other smartphone, but not an iphone !?! See Comment 1).

The mVisum Medical Communication System is a communication tool that allows medical professionals to securely receive, review and respond to patient data recorded at the point of care.

Security-
mVisum uses multiple levels of security and authentication to ensure HIPAA compliance. The handheld requires unique username and password for each physician, which is then authenticated by the server against the IMEI number and phone number. Data transmission between the server and the handheld is carried out through a patented double encryption system, where the data is first scrambled, which is further delivered through a 128 bit encrypted pipeline, each step individually meeting or surpassing HIPPA requirements. The sending console to server communication is also similarly architected, thus providing strong security end-to-end.

Types of Data Transferred include-

  • DICOM Images – loss-less representation of the original file, with Zoom capabilities.
  • CT Scan
  • MRI
  • EKG
  • Cine Loops
  • X-Rays
  • Free text

The system has advanced technology that allows the system to be availability aware,so that another physician can immediately be contacted if the original intended physician is unavailable.Once received, the physician can review data and securely respond with medical opinion, prescription or other critical orders. Real Neat, eh?

View more news videos at: http://www.nbcwashington.com/video.

mVisum System – http://www.mvisum.com/index.php

Related articles

 
2 Comments

Posted by on July 30, 2009 in images, Smartphone

 

Medical consultation on the Move


A new mobile handheld technology developed by mVisum of Cedar Brook, NJ, is been tested. This communication tool boasts of providing off-site cardiologists access to EKGs that can then be used to prescribe immediate treatment.

The Department of Veterans Affairs is testing this new system which seemingly enables fast transfer of clinical data to a smartphone for review within minutes. The mVisum Medical Communication System is stated to be a communication tool which permits health-care personnel to securely receive, review and respond to a patient”s medical data recorded at the point of care. This transfer of information notably takes place through secure HIPAA compliant internet servers, later transmitting it via mobile technology to the smartphone of the physician. More so, this system is also loaded with the ability to be availability aware, so that the patient can refer to another physician in the absence of the original intended physician. The various types of medical data that can be sent through this technique include DICOM images, EKGs, CT scans, MRIs, X-rays, etc. Along with this, textual information relating to the patient may also be included in the message for the purpose of getting a broader idea about the condition of the patient.

View more news videos at: http://www.nbcwashington.com/video.

The process begins with the recording of patient data at the point of care. Point of Care can include the physician’s office, medical center, hospital, or anywhere the patient is located and an system is installed.Data is transmitted securely and reliably to the physician’s mobile handheld device. The system has advanced technology that allows the system to be availability aware,so that another physician can immediately be contacted if the original intended physician is unavailable.Once received, the physician can review data and securely respond with medical opinion, prescription or other critical orders.


 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 30, 2009 in Uncategorized

 

Your cell phone is your ( doctor’s) best friend.


Microscopy provides a simple, cost-effective, and vital method for the diagnosis and screening of hematologic and infectious diseases.It is an essential tool in disease diagnosis and widely used all over the world. Unfortunately, the EXPERTISE required to use the tool, and to evaluate the findings is not very common. One requires a pathologist with many years of experience to make sense of those seemingly random and confused pixels. (I know, i am a pathologist :-)

It takes a lot of effort, and money to train a pathologist, equip him/her with all the instruments required, and then use the skills in a backward area without proper facilities. But the advent of digital imaging has solved many of our troubles. Telepathology made sure that we do not need a pathologist physically present at the site, to render a diagnosis.

But microscopy and digital imaging of the biopsy/tissue fragment was still a hassle. Now we have done better. You don’t even need a microscope to send a microscopic image over the network!! Researchers from the Univ. of California worked with high-powered LED – which retails for just a few dollars – coupled with a typical camera phone to produce a clinical quality image sufficient for detecting in a field setting some of the most common diseases in the developing world.

The newly developed technology, CellScope, allows for average cell cameras to be retrofitted with powerful microscopes, able to detect malaria parasites, and even fluorescent marker-stained tuberculosis bacteria.
Thus you have your humble cell-phone transformed into the sherlockian “cell-scope”.

“The images can either be analyzed on site or wirelessly transmitted to clinical centers for remote diagnosis. The system could be used to help provide early warning of outbreaks by shortening the time needed to screen, diagnose and treat infectious diseases,” University of California in San Francisco (UCSF)/UCB Bioengineering Graduate Group graduate student David Breslauer adds. CellScope could also provide remote access to digitized health records, and would be amenable to epidemiological studies, using triangulation or global positioning system location data, such that outbreaks could be monitored as they happen.

So maybe i could click a photomicrograph of that mole on my friend”s forearm, twitter it to my onco-pathologist friends, who view it on their smartphones and twitter / message their diagnosis back to me. Simple and fast, especially with my own group of pathologists on the network.

 
1 Comment

Posted by on July 22, 2009 in cell, Imaging, Pathology

 

Use your cell phone to diagnose diseases.


Microscopy provides a simple, cost-effective, and vital method for the diagnosis and screening of hematologic and infectious diseases.It is an essential tool in disease diagnosis and widely used all over the world. Unfortunately, the EXPERTISE required to use the tool, and to evaluate the findings is not very common. One requires a pathologist with many years of experience to make sense of those seemingly random and confused pixels. (I know, i am a pathologist :-)

It takes a lot of effort, and money to train a pathologist, equip him/her with all the instruments required, and then use the skills in a backward area without proper facilities. But the advent of digital imaging has solved many of our troubles. Telepathology made sure that we do not need a pathologist physically present at the site, to render a diagnosis.

But microscopy and digital imaging of the biopsy/tissue fragment was still a hassle. Now we have done better. You don’t even need a microscope to send a microscopic image over the network!! Researchers from the Univ. of California worked with high-powered LED – which retails for just a few dollars – coupled with a typical camera phone to produce a clinical quality image sufficient for detecting in a field setting some of the most common diseases in the developing world.

The newly developed technology, CellScope, allows for average cell cameras to be retrofitted with powerful microscopes, able to detect malaria parasites, and even fluorescent marker-stained tuberculosis bacteria.
Thus you have your humble cell-phone transformed into the sherlockian “cell-scope”.


“The images can either be analyzed on site or wirelessly transmitted to clinical centers for remote diagnosis. The system could be used to help provide early warning of outbreaks by shortening the time needed to screen, diagnose and treat infectious diseases,” University of California in San Francisco (UCSF)/UCB Bioengineering Graduate Group graduate student David Breslauer adds. CellScope could also provide remote access to digitized health records, and would be amenable to epidemiological studies, using triangulation or global positioning system location data, such that outbreaks could be monitored as they happen.

So maybe i could click a photomicrograph of that mole on my friend”s forearm, twitter it to my onco-pathologist friends, who view it on their smartphones and twitter / message their diagnosis back to me. Simple and fast, especially with my own group of pathologists on the network.


 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 22, 2009 in Uncategorized

 

Basics of Cerebrovascular accidents


Legendary CBS newscaster Walter Cronkite, who many referred to as “Uncle Walt,” has passed away, CBS News reports. He was 92 years old. As the CBS anchorman for almost 20 years, he was one of the most trusted faces in the American media. Reports say that he died due to a “cerebro-vascular accident” (also called Stroke) without specifying the exact pathology.

A stroke occurs when the blood supply to the brain is disturbed in some way. As a result, brain cells are starved of oxygen. This causes some cells to die and leaves other cells damaged. Most strokes happen when a blood clot blocks one of the arteries (blood vessels) that carry blood to the brain. This type of stroke is called an ischaemic stroke. Cerebral hemorrhage is when a blood vessel bursts inside the brain and bleeds (hemorrhages). With a hemorrhagic stroke, blood seeps into the brain tissue and causes extra damage.

  • Smokers
  • Irregular heart beat (atrial fibrillation)
  • Diabetes

Early diagnosis and treatment is the key to decreasing mortality due to a stroke. A transient ischemic attack (known as a TIA or ministroke) is similar to a stroke except that, with a TIA, the symptoms go away completely within 24 hours. People who have a TIA are very likely to have a stroke in the near future.

The most common early signs of a CVA are:

  • weakness down one side of the body, ranging from numbness to paralysis that can affect the arm and leg. Often, the weakness starts at a focal point and increases over the next few hours as the hemorrhage increases.
  • weakness down one side of the face, causing the mouth to droop. Speech may become slurry and swallowing becomes difficult.
  • severe headache and sudden loss of vision.
  • confusion, vomiting and loss of balance.

The World Health Organization estimates that 15 million people suffer a stroke worldwide each year, resulting in 5 million deaths and 5 million people permanently disabled.Stroke can occur in patients of all ages, including children. The Risk of stroke increases with age, especially in patients older than 64 years, in whom 75% of all strokes occur. Many people recover completely after a stroke. For others, it can take many months to recover from a stroke. Physical therapy and other retraining methods are greatly improving rehabilitation and recovery.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 18, 2009 in CVA, health, stroke

 

Use of Forensic animations


Bose–Einstein condensate In the July 14, 1995 ...

.O {font-size:149%;}

The law review literature is full of clichés such as “A picture is worth a thousand words” . Be it the judge or a Jury, it is very difficult to explain certain scientific and medical aspects by simple oral description. Technology of 3D animations is now freely available and can be used to explain many complicated medical and scientific arguments.Though animations have been around for many decades, its use in forensics started only by late 1980″s.

By 1992, it was estimated that computer- generated displays had been used in 858 cases in the US where litigation took place between major companies. In these, all except 15 settled out of court and in all the 15 cases which went to trial, the side using computer-generated displays was successful. Thus it is very apparent that use of scientifically created animations can go a long way in winning legal cases.

It has been reported that the first instance of computer-generated graphics being used in a British court took place at Oxford Crown Court in September 1994. There is yet no famous case of use of Animations in Indian courts. Animations can be used for demonstrative evidence, and the admissibility of animations in courts have been clearly expressed by the British courts. The following presentation takes an overview of animations used in Forensic sciences. To find out how you can use Animations in India, contact us at info@markivmedical.com, and visit us at Mark IV Studios, Coimbatore, India.

Requirement of Forensic Animations

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 17, 2009 in forensics, Law, US

 
 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.