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Category Archives: Imaging

Automatic Analysis of Medical Images from Microsoft Research


Analysis of medical images is a very useful tool in modern medicine. With advent of Artificial Intelligence and Evidence Based Medicine, automatic analysis of medical images promises significant advantages in reducing diagnostic errors and increasing speed of diagnosis.

The ‘Inner eye Project‘ by Microsoft Research is an extraordinary project which aims to extract semantic information from images. This demo shows how automatic anatomic recognition algorithms can be used in Radiology to decrease the information overload for physicians and specialists.

Furthur, it can be used for image analysis and comparison with large medical images database.

Microsoft Research is now working on extending the algorithms to allow it to pinpoint exact diseases and pathologies within the organs.This technology has potential for use in automatic diagnosis, personalized medicine and computer-assisted surgical intervention, to name a few.
Now lets just wait for something similar in Histopathology.

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Posted by on March 16, 2011 in CDSS, Imaging

 

communication, growth and inspiration-SIGGRAPH


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SIGGRAPH 2009 is over
(Conference: 3-7 August (Monday through Friday) and Exhibition: 4-6 August (Tuesday through Thursday).

It was sponsored by The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), an educational and scientific society uniting the world’s computing educators, researchers, and professionals to inspire dialogue, share resources and address the field’s challenges.Its one of the best scientific animation/hypermedia/multimedia platform in the world. It was full of galleries, competitions, events, presentations, Papers and exhibitions. A real feast!
We @markivmedcom / @LastMohican hope to participate the next time round. (2010). Here are Two interesting Interfaces which surfaced in SIGGRAPH 2009.

* 1) Immersive 3D plus Virtualization to let you move freely in Virtual world– A team from INRIA and Grenoble Universities in France (will) demo a new virtual reality system called Virtualization Gate.

Virtualization Gate that tracks users’ movements very accurately using multiple cameras, allowing them to interact with virtual objects with new realism.A user wears a head-mounted display (HMD) and moves through a virtual space while several cameras track his movement. The video here shows a guy kicking over virtual vases and pushing a virtual representation of himself around. A cluster of PCs is needed to perform the necessary image capture and 3D modeling.

* 2) Teleconferencing in Three dimensions

MxR works with USC’s Institute of Creative Technologies and the Interactive Media Division at the School of Cinematic Arts. ICT projects create and analyze immersive systems for education and training simulations that incorporate both real and virtual elements. IMD projects push the boundaries of immersive experience design and alternative controllers. The VRPsych Lab and Graphics Lab at ICT are frequent collaborative partners.

HeadSPIN: A One-to-Many 3D Video Teleconferencing System from MxR on Vimeo.

The MxR at the University of Southern California rapidly prototypes and explores techniques and technologies to improve the fluency of human-computer interactions and create visceral synthetic experiences.

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Posted by on August 11, 2009 in 3D, Imaging

 

Your cell phone is your ( doctor’s) best friend.


Microscopy provides a simple, cost-effective, and vital method for the diagnosis and screening of hematologic and infectious diseases.It is an essential tool in disease diagnosis and widely used all over the world. Unfortunately, the EXPERTISE required to use the tool, and to evaluate the findings is not very common. One requires a pathologist with many years of experience to make sense of those seemingly random and confused pixels. (I know, i am a pathologist :-)

It takes a lot of effort, and money to train a pathologist, equip him/her with all the instruments required, and then use the skills in a backward area without proper facilities. But the advent of digital imaging has solved many of our troubles. Telepathology made sure that we do not need a pathologist physically present at the site, to render a diagnosis.

But microscopy and digital imaging of the biopsy/tissue fragment was still a hassle. Now we have done better. You don’t even need a microscope to send a microscopic image over the network!! Researchers from the Univ. of California worked with high-powered LED – which retails for just a few dollars – coupled with a typical camera phone to produce a clinical quality image sufficient for detecting in a field setting some of the most common diseases in the developing world.

The newly developed technology, CellScope, allows for average cell cameras to be retrofitted with powerful microscopes, able to detect malaria parasites, and even fluorescent marker-stained tuberculosis bacteria.
Thus you have your humble cell-phone transformed into the sherlockian “cell-scope”.

“The images can either be analyzed on site or wirelessly transmitted to clinical centers for remote diagnosis. The system could be used to help provide early warning of outbreaks by shortening the time needed to screen, diagnose and treat infectious diseases,” University of California in San Francisco (UCSF)/UCB Bioengineering Graduate Group graduate student David Breslauer adds. CellScope could also provide remote access to digitized health records, and would be amenable to epidemiological studies, using triangulation or global positioning system location data, such that outbreaks could be monitored as they happen.

So maybe i could click a photomicrograph of that mole on my friend”s forearm, twitter it to my onco-pathologist friends, who view it on their smartphones and twitter / message their diagnosis back to me. Simple and fast, especially with my own group of pathologists on the network.

 
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Posted by on July 22, 2009 in cell, Imaging, Pathology

 

– Imaging technologies, Connectivity and the markets.-


Let the commoditization of medicine begin! | Trusted.MD Network

I was tempted to read this article, though the headlines(COMMODITIZATION of medicine) don’t appeal to the Human rights aspect of my personality. I find the choice of word very cynical and it brings to question the motives of the author. But the services he describes are definitely noteworthy.

I believe the author talks about providing the best radiology service in the most cost-effective manner. Looked at it this way, the services provided by Nighthawk teleradiology services is a boon for patients.It has the potential for bringing down the costs of healthcare. Any measure taken to reduce health costs will benefit the patient, even if the healthcare is being provided via third party ( Insurance) paying for the service.

Telerays.com is a new service allowing bidding for radiology services. You can understand more about the process here.

Since radiology involves interpretation of digital images, it makes real sense to get the best doctors at the best prices (wherever they may be) by making good use of technology.. Simple economics here. And, i dont think quality will really suffer. After a few possible initial hiccups and pruning out of “sub-standard” opiners, I am sure only quality work will prevail.Quality radiologists will always get work, wherever they are. Teleradiology services now being woven into this kind of business model shall definitely be a positive step towards health rights.After all, “TIMELY, best possible quality healthcare for all without discrimination” is what health rights is all about, in essence.

Wonder when will a chunk of pathology services go this way. Very soon, i believe.

 
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Posted by on October 27, 2008 in Imaging, Web 2.0

 

– Imaging technologies, Connectivity and the markets.-


Let the commoditization of medicine begin! | Trusted.MD Network

I was tempted to read this article, though the headlines(COMMODITIZATION of medicine) don’t appeal to the Human rights aspect of my personality. I find the choice of word very cynical and it brings to question the motives of the author. But the services he describes are definitely noteworthy.

I believe the author talks about providing the best radiology service in the most cost-effective manner. Looked at it this way, the services provided by Nighthawk teleradiology services is a boon for patients.It has the potential for bringing down the costs of healthcare. Any measure taken to reduce health costs will benefit the patient, even if the healthcare is being provided via third party ( Insurance) paying for the service.

Telerays.com is a new service allowing bidding for radiology services. You can understand more about the process here.

Since radiology involves interpretation of digital images, it makes real sense to get the best doctors at the best prices (wherever they may be) by making good use of technology.. Simple economics here. And, i dont think quality will really suffer. After a few possible initial hiccups and pruning out of “sub-standard” opiners, I am sure only quality work will prevail.Quality radiologists will always get work, wherever they are. Teleradiology services now being woven into this kind of business model shall definitely be a positive step towards health rights.After all, “TIMELY, best possible quality healthcare for all without discrimination” is what health rights is all about, in essence.

Wonder when will a chunk of pathology services go this way. Very soon, i believe.

 
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Posted by on October 27, 2008 in Imaging, Web 2.0

 

Imaging technologies, Connectivity and the markets.


Let the commoditization of medicine begin! | Trusted.MD Network


I was tempted to read this article, though the headlines(COMMODITIZATION of medicine) don’t appeal to the Human rights aspect of my personality. I find the choice of word very cynical and it brings to question the motives of the author. But the services he describes are definitely noteworthy.


I believe the author talks about providing the best radiology service in the most cost-effective manner. Looked at it this way, the services provided by Nighthawk teleradiology services is a boon for patients.It has the potential for bringing down the costs of healthcare. Any measure taken to reduce health costs will benefit the patient, even if the healthcare is being provided via third party ( Insurance) paying for the service.


Telerays.com is a new service allowing bidding for radiology services. You can understand more about the process here.


Since radiology involves interpretation of digital images, it makes real sense to get the best doctors at the best prices (wherever they may be) by making good use of technology.. Simple economics here. And, i dont think quality will really suffer. After a few possible initial hiccups and pruning out of “sub-standard” opiners, I am sure only quality work will prevail.Quality radiologists will always get work, wherever they are. Teleradiology services now being woven into this kind of business model shall definitely be a positive step towards health rights.After all, “TIMELY, best possible quality healthcare for all without discrimination” is what health rights is all about, in essence.


Wonder when will a chunk of pathology services go this way. Very soon, i believe.

Also see http://teleradproviders.com/, a complete radiology diagnostic support from Dr. Sumer Sethi

 
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Posted by on October 27, 2008 in Imaging, Web 2.0

 

– Telepathology made simple-


MEDTING – MedicalTube, medical meeting; exchange video and image



As a pathologist, I know the importance of collaboration and second opinions. The practice of pathology is sometimes very subjective and its not unusual to get three different diagnosis for the same tissue sample/ histopatholgy slide from three different pathologists.Besides, all pathologists at one institute tend to think along similar lines, further increasing chances of bias. But getting distant doctors to review any one case and histopathology slide has been difficult till date. The best we could do was “store-and-forward” telepathology, where the images of a histopathology slide were forwarded to known experts via email for second opinion. A very primitive means of practicing telepathology, if i may say so!


Enter Medting.

MEDTING is a clinical web portal that provides a platform for exchanging clinical cases, images, and videos. Physicians can post clinical cases with associated images or videos for discussion among colleagues. In addition, independent images or videos can be sent to the Atlas space for other to review. Other members of the community can then vote and write comments on the cases and images posted.”



Medting allows doctors from around the globe to offer their opinions on any histopathology slide (or any other clinical image). Any doctor can upload the facts and images related to any case for second opinions from experts all over the globe.Patient privacy is not compromised as names are not revealed and the site claims to be 100% HIPAA compliant.


The images uploaded presently on the site were of very good resolution. One could easily scan the whole slide, Zoom in on interesting areas of the slide, leave comments, tag images, share them, etc. It provides an excellent collaboration platform and can serve as an excellent educational tool. At present, it boasts of 1840 cases and 15760 images and videos. Cases and images are tagged with keywords using the SNOMED CT terminology.


Medting also offers premium membership and individual institutional support.


I like their service, though it is still very BASIC and has tremendous scope for improvement.

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Posted by on October 18, 2008 in Imaging, medical, Pathology