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Monthly Archives: August 2009

Kindle in Medicine



Kindle is a new device that is changing the face of reading. The best of the current lot of e-book readers, Kindle is a boon for medical students and professionals, allowing them access to hundreds of books on the go!. Kindle, now in its third avatar, the Kindle Dx (Deluxe) boasts of advanced features, like PDF support (experimental) , longer battery life, 5-way Controller and sleeker design.

Check out more features here.. You can view it from all angles, zoom into any area and look at its features.

Using Kindle in Medicine

* Easy for medical students to keep up with all their scheduled reading. You can download and read reference materials that you have read previously to refresh your memory.You can seek out new textbooks to look for answers too.
* Seeking out symptoms, conditions, and other relevant information is easy.You can view photos on the Kindle if you need to see pictures of various signs and symptoms conditions.
* Study medical texts and highlight portions of texts / make notes on the Kindle as you go. Zoom into images for micro details.Bookmark and annotate important portions.
* Research can be done on its built-in web browser ( experimental feature) , no need to carry a laptop to access the internet.It offers free Wireless access to Wikipedia
* .Multiple books can be read at once, no need to carry a JUMBO Grey”s anatomy or Robbin”s Pathology encyclopedias !! It boasts of storage capacity of 1500 / 3500 books, depending on the Model.
* You can listen to music while you read.
* Inbuilt Text-to-Speech feature lets you listen to your favorite books.

It has a clear policy for returning the instrument or any content bought ( within 7 days of purchase) and also One year limited warranty. The kindle library boasts of more than 300,000 books for download, and many more added regularly. Priced at 300 and 500 $$ , and weighing approx. 300 and 500 grams (depending on the model) it is still too pricey for open embracing of this technology. Some libraries have started lending out Kindles ( with preloaded content) to its patrons.

Personally speaking , i can see a lot of content being adapted for Kindle, provided the machine becomes less expensive.
Also , many more wireless features ( like chat, email, videos etc) need to be added. If more such functionality is added to justify its high prices, i expect a LARGE number of medical students turning to Kindle.

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Posted by on August 31, 2009 in education, elearning

 

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Web 2.0 in health


A tag cloud with terms related to Web 2.


With increasing avenues for communication and knowledge dissemination, the practice of health care is changing faster than imagined. Free services like you tube, face book, Wikis, blogs, Twitter, social networks eg. Patientslikeme and a host of other services provide a health consumer with ample information and opinions. No longer is a patient forced to blindly trust his doctor”s judgment. The patient can easily search for more opinions, review personal experiences of friends and strangers plus the latest research studies in the field. This has changed the role of a Doctor to one of facilitator of health, rather than the unquestionable saviour.

E-Health insider has come up with a 108 paged report titled ‘Web 2.0 in the Health Sector: Industry Review with a UK perspective’. {£575.00 (inc VAT)}


The report argues that e-health 2.0 will first and foremost be consumer-led. Health is consistently one of the most searched for subjects online. The application of web 2.0 technologies into health is already challenging traditional doctor-patient relationships and beginning to place far greater power in the hands of consumers. These changes are likely to be rapid and may prove highly disruptive. Further, it concludes that new applications based on social health networks and content generated by health service users themselves – such as reviews of doctors and hospitals – will rapidly evolve to challenge existing healthcare systems and create new ways of delivering health care.

The profiles provide a snapshot of innovation across healthcare: from organisations providing online communities for patients with specific conditions, tools for chronic disease management, sites that enable patients to rate the quality of care they receive, together with tools to enable clinicians to better search for and share research data.

No doubt Web2.0 has changed the game, bringing about a total rethink in long established practices.

With Web3.0 and Personalized Medical services like Webicinia and 23andMe (easy at home genetic testing) internet technologies are bound to change the rules of health care for ever.


 
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Posted by on August 31, 2009 in Health 2.0, Web 2.0

 

Web 2.0 in health


A tag cloud with terms related to Web 2.

With increasing avenues for communication and knowledge dissemination, the practice of health care is changing faster than imagined. Free services like you tube, face book, Wikis, blogs, Twitter, social networks eg. Patientslikeme and a host of other services provide a health consumer with ample information and opinions. No longer is a patient forced to blindly trust his doctor”s judgment. The patient can easily search for more opinions, review personal experiences of friends and strangers plus the latest research studies in the field. This has changed the role of a Doctor to one of facilitator of health, rather than the unquestionable saviour .

E-Health insider has come up with a 108 paged report titled ‘Web 2.0 in the Health Sector: Industry Review with a UK perspective’. {£575.00 (inc VAT)}

The report argues that e-health 2.0 will first and foremost be consumer-led. Health is consistently one of the most searched for subjects online. The application of web 2.0 technologies into health is already challenging traditional doctor-patient relationships and beginning to place far greater power in the hands of consumers. These changes are likely to be rapid and may prove highly disruptive. Further, it concludes that new applications based on social health networks and content generated by health service users themselves – such as reviews of doctors and hospitals – will rapidly evolve to challenge existing healthcare systems and create new ways of delivering healthcare.

The profiles provide a snapshot of innovation across healthcare: from organisations providing online communities for patients with specific conditions, tools for chronic disease management, sites that enable patients to rate the quality of care they receive, together with tools to enable clinicians to better search for and share research data.

No doubt Web2.0 has changed the game, bringing about a total rethink in long established practices.But this is just the beginning.

With Web3.0 and Personalized Medical services like Webicinia and 23andme , internet technologies are bound to change the rules of health care for ever.

 
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Posted by on August 31, 2009 in Uncategorized

 

Second life in Medical education


The New Zealand virtual world education group, Second Life Education New Zealand  (SLENZ), has set up a research project in the on-line virtual world of Second Life for  New Zealand educators to pilot  at least two projects into determining how multi-user virtual environments (MUVEs) might benefit New Zealand education and how  this can best be done.

Funded by the New Zealand Tertiary Education Commission the research project  has attracted considerable interest from educators both in New Zealand and abroad.

Learning in second Life — Check this video for Normal Birth Training in Second life !!

 

 
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Posted by on August 29, 2009 in Uncategorized

 

Digital Pathology


Download now or preview on posterous

AU7_1242326084.pdf (7223 KB)

Digital Pathology is an environment for the management and interpretation of pathology information that is enabled by the digitization of a glass slide. Digital pathology is software that delivers all the information a pathologist needs, anywhere, anytime. Transition from glass to digital slides, a gradual process, which will make pathology observations more quantitative and a searchable history of preclinical and clinical trials studies. 

http://medical.wesrch.com/paper_details/pdf/ME1AU7W0SEVOS/digital_pathology_technology

 
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Posted by on August 29, 2009 in Uncategorized

 

Using Cellphones to diagnose Malaria and Blood disorders



Microscopy provides a simple, cost-effective, and vital method for the diagnosis and screening of hematologic and infectious diseases.It is an essential tool in disease diagnosis and widely used all over the world. Unfortunately, the EXPERTISE required to use the tool, and to evaluate the findings is not very common. One requires a pathologist with many years of experience to make sense of those seemingly random and confused pixels.  (I know, i am a pathologist :-)

It takes a lot of effort, and money to train a pathologist, equip him/her with all the instruments required, and then use the skills in a backward area without proper facilities. But the advent of digital imaging has solved many of our troubles
. Telepathology and virtual microscopy made sure that we do not need a pathologist physically present at the site, to render a diagnosis.

But microscopy and digital imaging of the biopsy/tissue fragment was still a hassle. Now we have done better. You don’t even need a microscope to send a microscopic image over the network!! Researchers from the Univ. of California worked with high-powered LED – which retails for just a few dollars – coupled with a typical camera phone to produce a clinical quality image sufficient for detecting in a field setting some of the most common diseases in the developing world.


The newly developed technology, CellScope, allows for average cell cameras to be retrofitted with powerful microscopes, able to detect malaria parasites, and even fluorescent marker-stained tuberculosis bacteria.Thus you have your humble cell-phone transformed into the sherlockian “cell-scope“.

“The images can either be analyzed on site or wirelessly transmitted to clinical centers for remote diagnosis. The system could be used to help provide early warning of outbreaks by shortening the time needed to screen, diagnose and treat infectious diseases,” University of California in San Francisco (UCSF)/UCB Bioengineering Graduate Group graduate student David Breslauer adds. CellScope could also provide remote access to digitized health records, and would be amenable to epidemiological studies, using triangulation or global positioning system location data, such that outbreaks could be monitored as they happen.

So maybe i could click a photomicrograph of that mole on my friend”s forearm, twitter it to my onco-pathologist friends, who view it on their smartphones and twitter / message their diagnosis back to me. Simple and fast, especially with my own group of pathologists on the network.


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Posted by on August 27, 2009 in Uncategorized

 

Using iPhone as CDSS



Technology use has made the practice of medicine more accurate and more precise.One important feature has been knowledge management, in a way to achieve clinical advice for patient care based on number of items of patient data. Broadly called CDSS
Clinical Decision Support systems


“Clinical Decision Support systems link health observations with health knowledge to influence health choices by clinicians for improved health care”

The latest such application (pun intended) is eRoentgen™ for iPhone. It helps doctors order the most appropriate radiology test for their patients based on a diagnosis, sign or symptom.


eRoentgen Radiology DX 1.0– Size:- 1.6 MB
Physicians and other healthcare professionals use eRoentgen™ to choose the most appropriate imaging study for a selected diagnosis or symptom. The eRoentgen™ quickly and easily improves patient safety and the quality of the imaging workup.It is extremely useful in locations which do not have a radiologist to guide a general Physician regarding the most appropriate imaging test to be ordered for further work up of any patient. It reduces wasteful and needless tests, and also improves diagnostic accuracy.

This app can be purchased online or via the iPhone apps store.Priced at $49.99.
This app gets my Vote, for sure.

In addition to eRoentgen™ for iPhone, iAtros is in the process of developing applications for a variety of mobile devices.

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Posted by on August 24, 2009 in iPhone, Mobile device