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Monthly Archives: September 2009

12 Shocking Ideas That Could Change the World


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Posted by on September 29, 2009 in Uncategorized

 

Twenty rules of engagement in new age marketing


Recently, Read this interesting synopsis of the changing rules of engagement in the online world. I have edited a few original writs and added a few, but in essence it replicates ideas of Rich Meyer.

Twenty New rules for engaging your customers

1. Traditional mass marketing is dead.

2. Brand marketers no longer control the  message.
3. Your audience is using social media whether you decide to use social or not.
4. Great marketing is not enough to ensure success.
5. Senior manager need to get middle managers more involved in formulating strategy and implementation of tactics.
6. The best marketing plans in the world mean nothing without flawless execution.
7. To get consumers to buy you product forget about features and start thinking about how you product provides solutions to their problems.
8. There is no such thing as free social media programs.
9. Social media programs need to be tied back to business objectives. Executives need to agree on a measurement criteria for social media programs.
10. Keep it simple. If you can’t clearly explain your strategy and message to your employees than you need to start over.
11. The days of free spending consumers maybe over. Today consumers are saving more and spending less. It’s all about needs rather than want.
12. Web analytics should tell you a story of how your consumers are thinking about your site and products.
13. Employers have all the power now and can lowball new hires and increase workloads on current employees. However this will eventually change and lot more people will seek to leave big companies in search of smaller companies where they can provide a lot more input and be satisfied with their work.
15. Lowering prices is not a marketing or brand strategy.
16. Markets consist of human beings, not demographic sectors.
17. Learn to see the world in the eyes of your customer or website visit.
18. Simplicity is the new currency.
19.Don’t favor credentials over passion.
20. Speed has become even more of a competitive advantage in the age of social media.

Rich’s Rules of New Economy

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Posted by on September 25, 2009 in Business, health, Health 2.0, Web 2.0

 

Better imaging with Optofluidics


What is Optofluidics ?

Optofluidics refers to manipulation of light using fluids, or vice-verse, on the micro to nano meter scale. Optical devices which incorporate liquids as a fundamental part of the structure can be traced at least as far back as the eighteenth century when rotating pools of mercury were proposed as a simple technique to create smooth mirrors for use in reflecting telescopes. The field of optofluidics is a “marriage” of nano-photonics and micro-fluidics! The introduction of liquids in the optical structure enables flexible fine-tuning and even reconfiguration of circuits such that they may perform tasks optimally in a changing environment.This allows for enhanced optical detection in lab-on-a-chip systems with a potentially strong impact on bio-technology, life-sciences, and bio-medical/health-care industries.It is used in a broad spectrum of military and civilian applications for imaging, spectroscopy, communications,  sensing, and displays.

The technology has now allowed the introduction of an inexpensive and high-resolution microscope that has been engineered to fit onto a single chip (See Optofluidic microscope shrinks to fit on a chip.) The performance of the device is comparable to a 20x microscope, but in terms of size, cost and ability to mass produce, the device has significant advantages.

  • The lack of optical elements in the arrangement implies that there are no aberrations to worry about. 

  • This is an intrinsically space-conserving method. 
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  • The entire chip is illuminated from above; no light source needed sunlight is sufficient.


This portable and cheap device is particularly appealing for third-world applications where it could be used in the field to analyse blood samples for malaria or check water supplies for pathogens. In the future, the microscope chips could be incorporated into devices that are implanted into the human body. Pretty good.


An on-chip implementation of the optofluidic microscope.


In the set-up, a voltage of 25 V is applied across the inlet and outlet of a microfluidic channel that is 2.4 mm long, 40 µm wide and 13 µm high. The electric field draws the specimen across the aperture array in a steady stream. The array consists of 120 holes with a diameter of 0.5 µm and separation of 10.4 µm, fabricated on a 2D CMOS imaging sensor. The sensor comprises a grid lattice of 1280 x 1024 square pixels with a pixel size of 5.2 µm.

Also see – Developing optofluidic technology through the fusion of microfluidics and optics


Being a very exciting field with a plethora of potential applications, its no wonder that hundreds of high-tech companies are working to optimize the technology. Heres a list of microfluidics research groups

 
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Posted by on September 25, 2009 in Microfluidics, Optics, Sensor

 

Better imaging with Optofluidics


What is Optofluidics ?

Optofluidics refers to manipulation of light using fluids, or vice-verse, on the micro to nano meter scale. Optical devices which incorporate liquids as a fundamental part of the structure can be traced at least as far back as the eighteenth century when rotating pools of mercury were proposed as a simple technique to create smooth mirrors for use in reflecting telescopes. The field of optofluidics is a “marriage” of nano-photonics and micro-fluidics! The introduction of liquids in the optical structure enables flexible fine-tuning and even reconfiguration of circuits such that they may perform tasks optimally in a changing environment.This allows for enhanced optical detection in lab-on-a-chip systems with a potentially strong impact on bio-technology, life-sciences, and bio-medical/health-care industries.It is used in a broad spectrum of military and civilian applications for imaging, spectroscopy, communications, sensing, and displays.

The technology has now allowed the introduction of an inexpensive and high-resolution microscope that has been engineered to fit onto a single chip ( See Optofluidic microscope shrinks to fit on a chip.) The performance of the device is comparable to a 20x microscope, but in terms of size, cost and ability to mass produce, the device has significant advantages.

  • The lack of optical elements in the arrangement implies that there are no aberrations to worry about.
  • This is an intrinsically space-conserving method.
  • The entire chip is illuminated from above; sunlight is sufficient.


This portable and cheap device is particularly appealing for third-world applications where it could be used in the field to analyse blood samples for malaria or check water supplies for pathogens. In the future, the microscope chips could be incorporated into devices that are implanted into the human body. Pretty good.

An on-chip implementation of the optofluidic microscope.


In the set-up, a voltage of 25 V is applied across the inlet and outlet of a microfluidic channel that is 2.4 mm long, 40 µm wide and 13 µm high. The electric field draws the specimen across the aperture array in a steady stream. The array consists of 120 holes with a diameter of 0.5 µm and separation of 10.4 µm, fabricated on a 2D CMOS imaging sensor. The sensor comprises a grid lattice of 1280 x 1024 square pixels with a pixel size of 5.2 µm.

Also see – Developing optofluidic technology through the fusion of microfluidics and optics

Heres a list of microfluidics research groups

 
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Posted by on September 25, 2009 in Uncategorized

 

Digital Medicine: A truly semantic medical search engine – HealthBase


Image representing NetBase as depicted in Crun...


HealthBase is a new and truly semantic search engine based on NetBase’s Content Intelligence platform.When i first decided to try it out, i was not very hopeful, having spent many hours in the past analysing pathetic results from so called Smart search engines. But Boy, i was very pleasently surprised at the results !!


NetBase’s Content Intelligence technology reads every sentence inside documents, linguistically understands the content and powers breakthrough search experiences that deliver highly relevant answers and insights.


 I checked the search engine semantics by searching for a simple disease ” Asthma“.

All the results shown for Treatment, Causes and complications were almost 100% accurate, though the results for Pros and Cons were very ambiguous. In fact i don’t see too much justification for that section at present.
A few reviews on NetBase have not been very complimentary. but then, i have perceived a bias in them. Of course there are many other really good medical search engines, a few of them even calling themselves semantic. But most of them are just glorified and customized search engines without any really intelligent tool involved in calculating results.


 


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http://www.hakia.com/ 


 

But for my money, I would go with Healthbase anyday, until someone else can show me a better semantic medical search engine. 


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Posted by on September 24, 2009 in Uncategorized

 

A truly semantic medical search engine – HealthBase


Image representing NetBase as depicted in Crun...

HealthBase is a new and truly semantic search engine based on NetBase’s Content Intelligence platform.When i first decided to try it out, i was not very hopeful, having spent many hours in the past analysing pathetic results from so called Smart search engines. But Boy, i was very pleasently surprised at the results !!

NetBase’s Content Intelligence technology reads every sentence inside documents, linguistically understands the content and powers breakthrough search experiences that deliver highly relevant answers and insights.

 I checked the search engine semantics by searching for a simple disease ” Asthma“.
All the results shown for Treatment, Causes and complications were almost 100% accurate, though the results for Pros and Cons were very ambiguous. In fact i don’t see too much justification for that section at present.
A few reviews on NetBase have not been very complimentary. but then, i have perceived a bias in them. Of course there are many other really good medical search engines, a few of them even calling themselves semantic. But most of them are just glorified and customized search engines without any really intelligent tool involved in calculating results.

 
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  •  
But for my money, I would go with Healthbase anyday, until someone else can show me a better semantic medical search engine. 
 
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Posted by on September 24, 2009 in NetBase, search, Semantics

 

Best layout and design for pharma- communication


Best layout and design for pharma- communication: “

Over the years companies have adopted various tactics to get doctors to engage with their online product presentations, or e-details. Initiatives include obtaining permission from doctors to email them an e-detail, placing the e-detail on a pharmaceutical website, placing a banner on a website linking to an e-detail, and placing the e-detail on a doctor community website. The results have been varied..

There are a number of ways to e-present to doctors and choosing the best layout and design is not always easy. Making a simple bullet presentation with linear navigation (next/previous arrows) is one simple way to kill your content. But then, What actually works?
  • Pharma websites have been proved rarely to attract doctors (only 2 per cent of the 2,762 doctors questioned in a Doctors.net.uk survey stated pharmaceutical-owned websites as a source).
  • Banners on websites, although considered cheap, do not drive engagement and, dependent on banner location, may not allow you to know the profile of the individual clicking on your banner.
  • E-detail on a doctor community website, however, offers the advantage that doctors are already utilising the site on a daily basis, and campaigns can be promoted to specific specialties.

Understanding the audience

Doctors.net recently conducted a survey to investigate the best way to engage doctors with an e-detail. A total of 94 members of the community were surveyed, 32 of whom were GPs and 62 were in specialist care (across a number of different specialities). Of the 62 from specialist care, 43 were consultant/specialist registrar level. The study combined facilitated face-to-face research and non-facilitated online methodology to determine the optimal design structure for an e-detail based on doctor feedback and the speed with which doctors find information.

In the online study, 84 doctors were shown wireframe templates of potential e-detail layouts (template 1 contained three key messages; template 2 offered menu navigation and prioritised key messages; template 3 provided menu navigation, and template 4 was a linear ‘click through’). Participants were asked for their preferred layout based on certain criteria such as ease of use, design, and simplicity. The content was presented as data only and did not involve webcasts (or other rich media). The doctors were invited to indicate their favourite and their second-favourite template based on how they would most like to receive information online. Responses were submitted through an online form and results were collated.

Of the 84 doctors, 62 chose template 3: menu option as their most, or second most, preferred layout, making this the clear winner. With two points awarded for a first choice and one point for a second choice, the final rating was template 3: menu navigation in first place with 90 points, followed by template 2: menu navigation and prioritised key messages with 69 points, template 1: three key messages with 47 points and finally template 4: linear ‘click through’ with 45 points.Doctors stated that they felt template 3 was clearly laid out and that the left hand navigation showed exactly where to go to get the required information. It was also seen to demonstrate good use of space and the top buttons were popular. In addition they felt that the headings were obvious and the fact that they could choose where to go, among other things, was appreciated.

Below is a sample of template 3 – Menu navigation

Template 3: menu navigation prove to be the most popular choice in the online study, it also proved to be the most efficient format for finding information quickly, with the tasks being performed more than twice as quickly as with templates 2 and 4. Based on their speed, they also got to the information they wanted the quickest using template 3.

Template 4: the linear ‘click through’ model was the least popular with doctors in both studies.

Recommendation to companies wishing to engage with their target doctors using email / epresentations in 2009 would be to use the Left menu navigation approach.

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Posted by on September 18, 2009 in Uncategorized